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Leadership Strength: How To Confront A “Bullish” Leader

Leadership Strength: How To Confront A “Bullish” Leader

You’ve probably met the type. You know, the person that is outspoken but doesn’t care to give others a chance to speak. The person who speaks first and with force as a way to shut down differing opinions. The person who uses words like “should” and “need” liberally when making their point. The person who frames everything in a way that you can’t possibly disagree with them. The person who no one wants to argue with because they become even more forceful.

Some leaders think they are being strong when they bull their way through to get what they want. They are the proverbial “bull in a china shop.”

These leaders boldly flail about in an attempt to get their way or show their leadership strength (or dominance) and they have little concern for the damage they cause around them.

Leadership & Arrogance: Don’t Let It Go To Your Head

Leadership & Arrogance: Don’t Let It Go To Your Head

I recently published a guest post on skipprichard.com that has to do with arrogance in leadership. In many ways, leaders are particularly vulnerable to becoming arrogant. Here is a snippet:

Leaders are usually in leadership positions because they have proven themselves in some capacity. They may have had the best technical skills, or the boldest and best ideas, or maybe they found themselves in a leadership position because they knew how to work with and motivate a team of people to accomplish far more than they could alone.

As leaders rise, however, there is a tendency to let it go to our heads. The faster a leader rises, the more likely this is to happen. Pride begins to set in and pride is the gateway drug to arrogance. [read the article]

Have you seen this in others? Or, perhaps, have you seen this in yourself?

3 Tips For Reading On A Kindle Or Other E-reader

3 Tips For Reading On A Kindle Or Other E-reader

 

“Not all readers are leaders, but all leaders are readers.” ~ Harry Truman

There is no doubt that digital publishing has changed the publishing world. But I was a hold out.

Entering into a meeting with a consulting group, one of the men offered to help me with my bag while I grabbed a few things to carry to our meeting room. When I handed him the bag, he immediately reacted to how heavy it was.

He wondered aloud why my bag was so heavy. I told him it was because in addition to my laptop and various pens and notebooks, I usually carry around several books that I am working through.

Without any hesitation he stated rather bluntly, “Why don’t you just get a Kindle?”

A little taken aback by his directness and that he clearly expected an answer, I blurted out something about preferring paper books.

Leadership, Productivity, and My Vegetable Garden

Leadership, Productivity, and My Vegetable Garden

It happens every summer. No matter how good our intentions or how disciplined we are, at some point our vegetable garden gets away from us.

We know what we are supposed to do. Fertilize it by working in rich, organic material into the soil. Plant it. Water it. And keep the weeds out. If we do these basic things, we will have a decent harvest.

But too often we get distracted. We give it good attention in the few weeks after we plant it. But at some point during the summer, we just let it do it’s thing. Fortunately for us, we live in a part of the country where once your garden is established, watering isn’t usually an issue.

In our defense, this is not intentional. And we often have an excuse. Kids and family activities often take up a good portion of the weekend when we would normally give our garden attention. In fact it usually happens when we are away on vacation. But at some point, the garden goes crazy.

When Leading People Is Boring

When Leading People Is Boring

At some point you realize, leading people can be boring. Here’s how it happens.

Most people enter a career field because they love, or at least believe they will love, their craft. Doesn’t matter if it is programming, designing, video production, marketing, construction, IT, web, finance, etc.

And if you do well you will likely find yourself being promoted in some fashion. It may simply be a raise and being trusted with more significant projects. As leadership responsibility increases, tasks decrease. That’s a bit misleading, because you still have tasks, but you are no longer employed for your skill in your field, but rather for you ability to lead other people with the same skill (or related skills).