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6 Leadership Lessons from Software Development

6 Leadership Lessons from Software Development

If you have a smartphone, which statistics suggest that most of you do, then you are very familiar with messages letting you know that “an update is available” for the phone itself or one of the dozens of apps that likely live on your phone. It seems like there is an update for something on my phone nearly everyday.

If you are a little on the obsessive-compulsive side it can drive you nuts. Five minutes after you finally get the number in the red circle on your iPhone to disappear, it’s back.

As users of smartphones and tablets, we have become much more aware of the constant tweaking, updating, and bug-fixing that goes into software development.

But have you ever thought about what software development can teach us about leadership development? Here are six lessons that I have learned.

Stop Using “Manager” as a Dirty Word!

Stop Using “Manager” as a Dirty Word!

If you read articles and books about leadership I can guarantee you’ve seen it. Perhaps you’ve even done it.

I am talking about using the term “manager” as a dirty word.

I get it. When talking about leadership, it is helpful to contrast good qualities to strive for with bad qualities using personas (good cop, bad cop). But please stop portraying the good as “leader” and the bad as “manager.” Pick another term to represent the bad!

Here are a few reasons why.

The ONE Thing [Book]

The ONE Thing [Book]

The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results (by Gary Keller and Jay Papasan) is an excellent read for anyone wanting to accomplish something significant in their life. It is about focusing on the one thing now that will make the biggest difference down the road.

If you are in a leadership position, applying The ONE Thing principles to your life and to your organization will pay off huge dividends in time. Most won’t stick with the principles long enough to make a substantial difference, but if you do, hang on to your seat.

Even if you don’t have a formal leadership position at work, this book can be valuable. Why? Because it’s about weeding out the urgent and focusing on the important in life in general…work, family, spirituality, etc.